Ghost Shirt Society

2129 Words9 Pages
Lasher and his fellow members in the meeting talk about the society which has changed positively. The society has changed the mindset of the upper class people about machines, its efficiency and organization. So many lower class people are employed due to this revolution. Without any question technology has developed fast after the last two world wars. So Ghost Shirt Society rebels against the managers and engineers. People thank God for making their life happy after world wars without realizing the fact that the technological development is worse than the impacts created by the two world wars in the minds and lifestyle of people. If there is any lagging in man power or where human being may face danger there is a scope for emergence of…show more content…
But the need for their being put into effect is far greater than all of the difficulties, and infinitely greater than the need for our national holy trinity, Efficiency, Economy and Quality’. ‘Men, by their nature, seemingly, cannot be happy unless engaged in enterprises that make them feel useful. They must, therefore, be returned to participation in such enterprises’. ‘I hold, and the members of the Ghost Shirt Society hold: ‘That there must be virtue in imperfection, for Man is imperfect, and Man is a creation of God. ‘That there must bevirtuein frailty, for Man is frail, and Man is a creation of God. ‘That there must bevirtue in inefficiency, for Man is inefficient, and Man is a creation of God. ‘That there must be virtue in brilliance followed by stupidity, for Man is alternately brilliant and stupid, and Man is a creation of…show more content…
But the revolution proves to be a failure. Paul and his friends dream are shattered and surrendered as the society deems machines as the most important thing to lead a life of contentment. The human being always under estimate their capacity and it is an existing problem in the United Nations of America. In Player Piano, Paul expresses his thoughts and feelings but that is not properly understood by the society. Kurt Vonnegut tries to express the struggle of the central character in identifying his accepted goals. He is against the machine-oriented society. Paul shows concern for the society, even though he lacks spiritual commitment to progress. Paul concludes that he lacks “the ability to be moved emotionally, almost like a lover, by the great omnipresent, omniscient spook, the corporate personality” (67). Dr. Kroner, Paul’s father’s old friend and chief manager, has the sense of spiritual commitment. Paul and Kroner talk about the most dangerous time. Kroner describe the situation
Open Document