Lord Mahavira Case Study

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When we live in a democratic country in India where the population is dominated by the Hindus, people who fall under the category of minorities suffer a lot, sometimes because of their race or their religious practices or the share in the society they possess. A basic premise of a representative democracy is that all those subject to policy should have a voice in its making. However, policies enacted by electorally accountable governments often fail to reflect the interests of disadvantaged minorities. When we talk about a particular religion, we should know a little about its past and from where it all started. In Jainism people believe that Lord Mahavira was the first Tirthankara but this is not the case as Mahavira was the 24th Tirthankara…show more content…
But it differs when it comes to the main sects of Jainism, Digambaras and Swetambaras. Jainism prohibits women from appearing naked. It is for this reason that the Digambaras, who mainly considers renunciation of clothes necessary to Moksha by adding that the women can’t achieve Moksha. They also believe in the concept which says that in order for a women to get Moksha she must be reborn in male form before they can achieve Moksha. On the other hand the Swetambaras, who allow sadhus to wear clothes, believe that women can achieve Moksha. Some men do consider women to be inherently inferior, but most do not. There are more Swetambara sadhvis than sahdus and women have been very influential in the Jain religion. According to Swetambara Jains consider Lord Mallinath, the 19th Jain Tirthankara was a female but according to Digambaras they consider that Lord Mallinath was…show more content…
Lord Mahavira did made a crucial revolt against the existing tradition and extended his full support for the upliftment of women. Looking at the immoral practices and the disgraceful attitude of men towards women, Lord Mahavira stood against these pernicious social elements. He tried to improve their status in walks of life and tried freeing her from indignation. Even though the patriarchal form of the society was developed and nuns were treated as slightly inferior to monks in certain respects. The Jains believe that nothing holds women as anything less than human beings who, like all souls, have the right and capability to achieve
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