Essay On Melting Pot Theory

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The melting pot theory of assimilation encourages immigrants to be a functional part of the whole society and to share similarities with the rest of people in the country (McDonald & Balgopal, 1998). However, melting into American society is not that easy for foreign immigrants especially Asian immigrants as we known. One reason is that some parts of the melting pot theory are not practiced. Because of the different skin color, ethnicity, or home language, plenty of Asian Americans have been racially discriminated. It is problematic to say share similarities with others. They are not promoted to embrace the dominant culture until these alien cultures have been washed off. On the other hand, the melting pot assimilation theory fails to teach…show more content…
The shared similarities, however, become stereotype in others eyes. Asian culture values education probably more than any other race. In Asian thinking, education is something that can change ones life. It’s not easy to be the elite in academic, but it’s definitely a way worthy to try. In others’ eyes, Asian Americans are also too strict in children’s education. Like the example of Tiger mother, who assigned full schedule for her daughter from every aspect of lives. No matter the academic study or extracurricular interests, even the spared time is assigned in advance. Although the daughters were both admitted to Ivy League colleges, criticism of her strictness still keep…show more content…
Because the benefits that are supposed to belong to Asian Americans have been taken away. For example, in order to pursue diversity and remain equality, almost all colleges in America set up a certain percentage of admissions based on races. According to “The Opportunity Cost of Admission Preferences at Elite Universities” by sociologist Thomas J. Espenshade, Asian Americans need to earn, on average, 140 points more than white students and 450 points more than black students to receive the equal consideration by colleges. What is more, if race is no longer a key factor in college admission, Asian Americans will have a greater opportunity to be admitted in the elite
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