Essay On Polish Resistance

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The Polish Resistance
I will be writing about the Polish Resistance and their contributions to stopping the Nazi’s regime as well as their systematic killing of Jews. The Polish Resistance was an underground group that was mainly made up of people who were civilians as well as everyday people. I will be writing will going into more depth about the missions, duties, and success of the Polish Resistance. I am going and go into depth on how they completed their missions as well as how they used strategic attacks to wear out the Nazi Army. This relates to the
Zookeeper 's Wife because Jan and Antonina were in the Polish Resistance. The book goes into depth about some of the duties that they had to carry out for the polish resistance as well as
responsibilities
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The Polish Home Army at its forefront, was the largest underground resistance in all of Nazi-occupied Europe. The movement covered both the German and Soviet zones of occupation. The Polish defense against the Nazi occupation was an important part of the European fight against the axis powers, disrupting German supply lines to the Eastern Front, providing military intelligence to the British, and for saving more Jewish lives in the Holocaust than any other Allied organization or government. It was a part of the Polish Underground State. These "home-made" soldiers seemed indistinguishable in appearance, some even wearing German military uniforms, yet all wore the red and white armbands that identified them as the Sons and Daughters of Poland. Each person acted in whatever capacity he could, and supported the Home Army in resisting Nazi terror. The Home Army conducted various strategies of subterfuge which included propaganda, espionage, sabotage, diversionary tactics, explosives, and assassinations of German officers. The Poles knew that if they were to be caught by the Germans, it would have resulted in their deaths, but they continued to fight anyway. The Polish nation had suffered more than a century of violent attacks, and occupation by foreign powers - resistance became second nature to them. They refused to
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