Essay On Rosa Parks

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During the 1900s, life for Rosa Parks was never easy. Parks grew up during the time of the Jim Crow laws. The Jim Crow Laws were targeted mostly on African American heritage. They were in favor of white people as they separated African descent from the mix of society. These laws included regulations on public restrooms, drinking fountains, education, and public transportation. Rosa Parks is an example of how unfair African Americans were treated in the United States, and her fight in battles such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Civil Rights Movement drove a plethora of others to join her side to change the way “colored people” were seen in America. Even as a child, Rosa Parks was met with memories of prejudices against black people.…show more content…
During this time, colored people were not allowed at the front of the bus. There were city laws that required racial segregation of public transportation. On Parks’ bus there were 10 seats permanently reserved for white passengers, and she was seated behind those ten seats not violating any law. The bus became crowded, and the driver told her to scoot back. Seeing as she was not in any of the seats saved for white passengers, she stayed seated. James Blake, bus driver at the time, seemed to have been changing the law of segregation between white and black passengers. Although she had been on her given side of the bus, Blake called the police, and she was immediately…show more content…
District Court. They recognized the racial bus segregation as unconstitutional. Browder v. Gayle, the bus segregation case, was determined on June 4, 1956 and the ruling was made on November 13, 1956. Park’s arrest documents are with the files of the Browder case as evidence. Soon after, Rosa Parks became the “Mother of the Civil Right Movement” in her peaceful protest. The Civil Rights Movement itself was another peaceful protest against racism. It included groups that targeted equal rights and an end to legalized racial discrimination. Her choices made long term effects, and her community was forever thankful for
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