Royal Monarchy

1282 Words6 Pages
Many young children dream of becoming a prince or princess. They play dress up and watch movies for hours, dreaming of the day that their fantasy becomes reality. It may seem far-fetched, but a select lucky few will eventually live their childhood fantasy by marrying into the British royal monarchy. But is it really worth it? As the Duchess of York stated while conversing with a friend, “No woman ever leaves the House of Windsor with her head”(Brown 393). Considering that most of the effects of marrying into the British royal family are detrimental, including a lack of independence, a difficult transition into royal life, involvement of politics in the relationship, strained relationships, the pressure to be perfect, attention from the media,…show more content…
This may seem completely ludicrous but it is an improvement of a previous rule which required all members of the monarchy to get approval from the Queen. It is highly unlikely that this act holds any significance in modern times, as the Queen would only reject a marriage if it was under the advice of the Prime Minister. Additionally, that when one marries a prince and that prince becomes king, the wife does not hold the title of queen or princess but instead becomes a queen consort. This automatically makes the act of marrying into the monarchy unappealing by making the dream of becoming a princess completely unattainable. If this fantasy can be crushed with a single rule, then what else will the monarchy do to someone once they enter the royal…show more content…
According to Wright, no commoner has ever maintained a career after marrying a royal. For example, the public relations company run by Sophie Rhys-Jones, who married Prince Edward, failed after she accidentally made comments about her in-laws, which shows how royalty and business do not mix (Wright). Additionally, the wife of Prince Rainier of Monaco, Grace Kelly, was unable to continue acting and was disliked for being an American which made her extremely “lonely and unhappy”(Wright). Not only do these accounts prove that becoming a royal negatively affects one’s professional life but they also depict how this change can be detrimental to one’s mental
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