Essay On Teenage Pregnancy

912 Words4 Pages
Teenage Pregnancy Teenage Pregnancy, also known as adolescent pregnancy, is in females under the age of 20. A female can become pregnant from sexual intercourse after she has begun to ovulate, which can be before her first menstrual period but usually occurs after the onset of her periods. In well-nourished females, menstrual period usually takes place around the age of 12 or 13. Pregnant teenagers face many of the same pregnancy related issues as other women. There are, concerns for those under 15 to age as they are less likely to be physically developed enough to sustain a healthy pregnancy or to give birth. For girls aged 15-19 risks are associated…show more content…
According to the United Nations Populations Fund (UNFPA), “Pregnancies among girls less than 18 years of age have irreparable consequences. It violates the rights of girls, with life-threatening consequences in terms of sexual and reproductive health, and poses high development costs for communities, particularly in perpetuating the cycle of poverty”. Health consequences include not yet being physically ready for pregnancy and childbirth leading to complications and malnutrition as the majority of adolescents tend to come from lower-income households. The risk of maternal death for girls under the age 15 in low and middle income countries is higher than for women in their twenties. Teenage pregnancy also affects girls’ education and income potential as many are forced to drop out of school which ultimately threatens future opportunities and economic prospects. However, recent studies have found that many of these mothers had already dropped out of school before becoming pregnant, but those in school at the time of their pregnancy were as likely to graduate as their peers. The correlation between earlier childbearing and failure to complete high school reduces career opportunities for many young women. Life outcomes for teenage mothers in other factors, such as poverty or social support, may be more important than the age of the mother at the birth. Many solutions to counteract the more negative findings have been proposed. Teenage parents who can rely on family and community support, social services and child-care support are more likely to continue their education and get higher paying jobs as they progress with their
Open Document