Essay On The Importance Of Being Earnest

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THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST BY BELLA SALAZAR

Oscar Wilde once said “The truth is rarely pure and never simple.” The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People by Oscar Wilde was written during summer 1894 in Worthing, England and was first published in 1898 by L. Smithers. In the most basic sense, The Importance of Being Earnest is a drama because it’s a play, first performed on 14 February 1895 at the St James 's Theatre in London. It 's also a comedy, not only in the modern laugh-out-loud way, but also in the classical sense, in that it features a set of characters overcoming adversity to achieve a happy ending. The play 's major themes are the triviality with which it treats institutions as serious as marriage, and the resulting satire of Victorian ways.
The characters are all very hilarious, the play has that let say sophisticated sense of humor that it makes you enjoy each of the characters; you will have so much fun reading the dialogues. I especially liked Algernon’s with the entire bumburist thing; although is not the main character I feel like it is. Everything he says make sense to me even
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The plot of The Importance of being Earnest is that the characters are always lying to get out of social or familial duties and do something more enjoyable. The Victorian age appears in each of the line. Marriage is seen as a way of maintaining or bettering your social position. Also, Respect and reputation is essential at the point that the upper classes care about being respectable so much so that they do a lot of lying about it. It also reveals the differences between the behavior of the upper class and that of the lower class. Members of the upper class display a great deal of pride and pretense, while the lower classes are less pretentious and more humble but it is funny that they are equally good at making jokes. I love the way Oscar Wilde satirizes the arrogance and hypocrisy of the aristocracy, it makes the entire book more
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