1984 George Orwell Style Analysis

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Novelist, George Orwell, in his novel, 1984, depicts a dystopian society where the protagonist wrestles with oppression and totalitarianism. Orwell was influenced by totalitarian regimes of the time, including Hitler’s Nazi Germany and Stalin’s Soviet Union. Both glorified their perspective leaders as demi-gods and saviors, which required destruction of all individuality. The tone of 1984 is described as gloomy with a matter-of-fact style. The characters negative response to their way of living challenges their sense of identity and shapes the meaning of the whole novel by explaining how their society is like. Orwell begins his novel by illustrating what’s in the society. One object in the novel is a Big Brother poster with the words “BIG…show more content…
Winston has committed thought crimes, wrote unfavorable opinions of Big Brother in a journal, but he also hid his thoughts from other characters. Earlier on in chapter 5, Winston and his comrade, Syme, had a discussion about the next edition of a Newspeak dictionary. How in the future people won’t be able to understand a conversation like Winston and Syme are having. Winston has a different opinion from Symes and says, “ ‘Except--’ began Winston doubtfully, and he stopped. It had been on the tip of his tongue to say ‘Except the proles,’ but he checked himself, not feeling fully certain that this remark was not in some way unorthodox.” This shows Winston holds back what he actually wants to say because he is scared for them to find out about his hidden hate for Big Brother. In the end, Winston does get caught and the consequences of his lack of desire to change was to be tortured and brainwashed. In the last chapter of the novel, chapter 6, Orwell writes, “Two gin-scented tears trickled down the sides of his nose. But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother.” Winstons eagerness to rebel, to hate Big Brother, have been brainwashed. Taken from him. Showing the theme of totalitarianism, how not even the thoughts and feelings are safe within the individual. The government will have utter control…show more content…
With a character who expresses his hate for society and its government. The character's response helps Orwells meaning in his writing. Orwell removes the curtain that hides reality behind it. A reality not so different from his novel, a life portrayed by images that are in front of us and which misleads or controls rather than inform. Our society has similar traits from the book, politicians lie, Department of Defense wages wars, and the penal system torture. Winston's response and change contributes to the meaning by representing societies citizens. How people want to change what's happening and express themselves, but have a high chance of
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