Rhetorical Devices In Mlk Speech

1019 Words5 Pages
Making a statement to society in dramatic ways is something that has been done throughout all of history, and the bombing of a church in Alabama during the 1960s is no different. Three little girls died at the hands of someone, it doesn’t matter who, that wanted to make a statement to society in order to prevent change in society. MLK delivered a eulogy for these girls in which he props them up on a seemingly godly pedestal, equating them to the closest descendants of the lord Himself. King empowers people to look at these girls as not sufferers of a tragic occurrence, but as “martyrs” of a bigger picture movement, the warriors in a crusade fighting against the racial injustice of the South, but more importantly the whole country. King introduces…show more content…
Good night, those who symbolize a new day. And may the flight of angels take thee to thy eternal rest. God bless you.” In this comparison, MLK uses a line from Hamlet. The line is delivered in the last act and scene of the play, Act 5 Scene 2, to be specific, which plays into his earlier…show more content…
King introduced the little girls lives as a play would: graciously, unoffending, and subtle. To end it off, he uses a famous line from one of history’s most heralded minds of literature. These lines from Shakespeare is the last thing the audience hears, and it is no doubt King was considering his audience when writing this speech in that he wanted them to remember his speech, but more importantly the little girls. Putting this line at the end of the speech sums up what King wanted to do to rightfully honor the girls. By doing this, he ended his speech the same way it began: as a play. Doing this, for one, shows consistency among MLK because he successfully opened his speech introducing a play, and ended it with a
Open Document