European Colonialism: The Major Factors Of European Imperialism

812 Words4 Pages
The leaders of the major industrial powers which were Britain, France and Germany were all wanting to acquire more land for their colonies because they needed more territory. Soon after many small industrial powers such as Spain, Holland, Portugal, Italy, Japan and the USA also wanted to be in the run for more land.This essay will be discussing four factors that led to imperialisation - Religious, Political, Strategic and Economic Many Europeans believed that the African people were of an inferior and uncivilized nature. To most of the Europeans imperialism was a struggle against their belief system which was Christianity. Christian Missionary Societies forced their government to colonize and build the right facilities for the religious…show more content…
Christian missionaries have participated in imperialist domination of the Native Americans and Asians, in the past, by imposing cultural changes on native populations in the name of religion. They have succeeded in removing their cultural identities. The technological disparity between the new world and the old world allowed for the west to gain a distinct psychological advantage over the new world. Most of the European missionaries during the colonial era were Catholic. That was partly because two Catholic countries, Spain and Portugal, took the lead in exploration. Later, France also sent Catholic missionaries…show more content…
Europe was looking to bolster their trade markets abroad. Think of it this way: in order to sell more goods, you need more places to sell them. So, with this thinking in mind, the Europeans said to themselves, 'What better place than Africa and Asia?' Along the same lines, colonies on these continents were seen as great places to get cheap, raw materials for Europe's factories that had been created due to the industrial revolution. Add to this that Europe needed a place to house and employ their surplus population, and you can see why New Imperialism held the promise of economic growth. In fact, an excellent example of this were the Dutch, who sent almost a million people into Indonesia to work. Although many of these Europeans they sent either succumbed to disease or fled back to Europe, the Dutch influence can still be seen in Indonesia. Industrialists and businesswomen were eager for opportunities to invest their spare money in ventures which would bring them bigger profits than their investments in their own countries. They put their government under pressure to take over undeveloped lands. The mother country collected more money by charging the colonies
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