Evil In Doctor Faustus

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In Christopher Marlow’s Doctor Faustus, the main character evidently named Doctor Faustus constantly tries to discern his place within the world. He looks up to God and exclaims, “What art thou, Faustus, but a man condemned to die?” (Faustus 4.4 22). Faustus want to learn the importance of his existence. He was once an important member of the Church who was highly respected. He claimed the title of Doctor for his study of theology. However, his deal with the devil laid out a path of despair that he will henceforth follow. For twenty-four years of control over Mephistopheles, Faustus will give his soul to the devil. Obviously, this evil act may fool some readers into believing that Faustus is wholly evil, but the truth is quite different. He…show more content…
In the beginning, he is a curious and naive man who seeks bargain with the devil for his own benefit. With his deal, he scoffs at the notion of eternal damnation. In his discussion with Mephistopheles about the pains of his damnation, Faustus says, “Think’st thou that Faustus is fond to imagine That after this life there is any pain? No, these are trifles and mere old wives’ tales” (Faustus 2.1 128-130). Mephistopheles plainly tells Faustus that he is living proof of the contrary to Faustus’ beliefs. Regrettably, Faustus continues onward with his magical practices. He honesty believes he is a hero in his own story. He gains more confidence throughout the story until it reaches its peak, and then it crashes down during his final hours of life. All of his wealth, accomplishments, and exploits mean nothing when he is faced with the devil’s ever closing grip. His confidence shatters as he nervously awaits the end of his life. At the end, he recognizes the error in his ways and no longer believes that he is a good man. In his last words, he says, “O, mercy, heaven! Look not so fierce on me! Adders and serpents! Let me breath a while! Ugly hell, gape not! Come not, Lucifer! I’ll burn my books! O, Mephistopheles!” (Faustus 5.3 181-185). His final words show the regret in his heart. He wants to destroy the precious books of knowledge and magic that he held so dear throughout the whole story. He finally learns his…show more content…
Every time Faustus has second thoughts about his pact with the devil, Mephistopheles plants some form of entertainment or fear tactic in front of him. Faustus is too concerned about immediate gratification that he loses sight of the future. Mephistopheles exclaims that “Fools that will laugh on earth, most weep in hell” (Faustus 5.2 98). This quote hints towards Faustus’ future. Little did Faustus know that the torment of hell was right before his eyes. As the main character, he, at times, fights against the trap he was placed into, but Mephistopheles always beats him. Faustus is still a person who tries to do good, but Mephistopheles always tears him away from that path. In the beginning of the story, Faustus wanted to use his powers to benefit the lives of others and learn more about the world and the stars. He wanted to build a safe kingdom for people to live in. However, Mephistopheles always convinces Faustus to use a different alternative, because the devil doesn’t work the way Faustus wants him to. For proof, Faustus wanted a wife, but the devil won’t allow marriage. At the very end, Faustus repents for a second after the old man tries to speak some sense into Faustus. Faustus says, “Accursed Faustus, wretch, what hast thou done? I do repent and yet I do despair Hell strives with grace for conquest in my breast. What shall I do to shun the
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