Examples Of Civil Liberties In Night By Elie Wiesel

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Civil Liberties "The witness forced himself to testify. For the youth of today, for the children that will be born tomorrow. He does not want his past to become their future." (Wiesel, 15). Elie Wiesel was held in a concentration camp during World War II. Wiesel and thousands of other Jewish people were held in death camps against their will for the sake of German "racial purity". Japanese-Americans were also held in camps after the attack in Pearl Harbor. Concentration camps in Europe for Jews were harsher than internment camps in America for Japanese-Americans, but they were both extremely undesirable places to be. Both types of camps captured innocent people and kept them under the notion of their heritage and ancestry. Most Japanese Americans …show more content…

Hitler wanted to create a perfect race of people and to create it, he killed off those that were not suited for his perfect world. In this group were homosexuals, people with disabilities, and Jewish people. They were taken to camps where they dropped like flies. One of the many horrors of the death camps were the crematoriums, where people were burned alive. Small children and babies were thrown into pits of fire because they could not work. (Wiesel, 32). This sight permanently scarred the audience of this tragic scene. Obviously, the children did not deserve their fate because they had not done anything to justify this action. A soldier remembered finding a death camp and freeing the inhabitants, "I don't know how any of them could stand on their feet. They were nothing but skin and bones. They couldn't speak. Most of them were lying on the ground, many of them were unconscious," (Light One Candle, 377). The prisoners in the death camps were treated like animals. No persons civil rights should be taken away from them to that extent. It is inhuman. Those kept in the German death camps were treated very …show more content…

In the article, "Facts Force America to Stop Pussyfooting" from The San Francisco Chronicle it argues that, "Among the thousands of Japanese who knew of the plot there was not one, no matter where born, who came forward to warn the United States." (22). The writer of the article believes that all Japanese should be taken as a security measure. Any one of the Japanese-Americans living in the United States could be a traitor and there is no way to know who. The safest thing for the American people is to remove the Japanese-Americans from their daily lives. The would make sure that all traitors would be unable to hurt the United States again. Yet the majority of the people taken into the internment camps were innocent and loyal to the United States, rather than Japan. Even the president realized that was they were doing was unjust. He told the Sacramento Bee that it is one thing to bring people to internment camps for the safety of a nation, but it is another to take away the rights and possessions of innocent, loyal Americans. (14). The Japanese-Americans were innocent and were unfairly taken into confinement. Their rights were taken away on a discriminatory note. Their treatment was

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