Examples Of Cognitive Conflict

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Cognitive Conflict Conflict related to differences in perspectives and judgments a. Task-oriented b. Results in identifying differences c. Usually functional conflict Cognitive conflict is a term used to describe disagreements that are issue-focused, not personal, and are characteristic of high performing groups. These disagreements are substantive in nature; they are about ideas and approaches. Cognitive conflicts are what we often seek in brainstorming where we encourage open problem-focused discussions to test ideas and assumptions, consider and reconcile differences, and undertake true collective decision-making. Conflicts are part of individual relationships and organizational development, and no relationship or organization can hope…show more content…
Make the approach a. Reflect before you begin. b. Invite the other party to a conversation c. Be clear about your intentions d. State your goal - a positive resolution Making the approach is the primary step in resolving any form of conflict – if both sides refuse to acknowledge the prospect of resolution, only increased friction will come about. After a period of reflection, one should approach the opposing party and invite them to engage in conversation. In addition, rather than avoid bringing the issue up directly, be clear about what you want to discuss in order to ensure equal focus. There shouldn’t be any more escalation of whatever conflict has come to light: make sure to express the desire for a clean resolution of the issue. 2. Share perspectives a. Ask for the other person’s perspective b. Paraphrase what you hear c. Acknowledge your contribution d. Describe your…show more content…
Hear what they have to say, and once you do, paraphrase it so they know you understand them. Once that’s cleared up, state your side and describe your perspective on their stance, and acknowledge why there is a difference. Once you have created this equal playing field, you can start finding a potential resolution. 3. Build understanding a. Discuss one issue at a time b. Clarify assumptions c. Explore interests and feelings Now that everything has been stated and everyone is ready to move on, there should be an effort to identify and approach topics both parties view as important. This step should be executed carefully: make sure to avoid finger pointing, using pronouns, and implying responsibility on anyone in particular. By using neutral, inoffensive language, a sense of ease is created – the last thing you want in these situations is for anyone to feel attacked, as the issue may escalate even further. If done right, there should be room and acknowledgement to create an agenda of things to work towards. 4. Agree on solutions a. Reality test – Is this doable? b. Durability test – Is this durable? c. Interest test – Does this meet all parties’
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