Examples Of Cowardice In Tangerine

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There are many important ingredients that go into making a good loaf of bread. The most important ingredients, however, are water, flour, and yeast. Without water, the bread can’t have texture. Without yeast, the bread won’t rise. And without flour, the base of the bread, there is no bread. A villain is the same way. Without immorality, the villain has no substance to make him great. Without self-centeredness, the villain cannot rise to be the greatest villain he can be. Without cowardice, the base for a villain, the villain, is no villain at all. Edward Bloor, the author of Tangerine, makes Erik Fisher, from the recipe for a perfect villain. He gives Erik the right amount cowardice, a pinch of self-centeredness, and a dash of immorality in …show more content…

Cowardice also leads to the atrocious deeds that shape an awesome villain. In the great book, Tangerine, Erik shows that his cowardice can be a very powerful tool in being the great villain he is. To illustrate his cowardice to his readers, Erik threatens Paul with his baseball bat. Rage takes over his swollen and beat up face, with his mouth twisted into a mean snarl looking. Bravely, Paul stands up to him. Erik cowers, backing off, surprised at how Paul reacted to him. This moment, this twisted moment, leads to more of the evil things that shape this great villain. What better than an awesome hero to show how great this villainous guy is? That is Paul, one the most bravest heroes that the books have ever seen. For instance, when Erik threatened him, he kept his cool and never surrendered. Dauntlessly for the good of all humanity, he drove out the enemy. Paul helps Erik become the great villain he is, without evening knowing that he helping evil become greater than the …show more content…

Erik is the epitome of immoral. Selfishly, Erik steals from his neighbors. With no one guarding, their houses are tented and vulnerable to villains like Erik. This is where moment of cowardice comes, lurking in the shadows. Erik steals people’s precious items and valuable memories without thinking twice. Plain bread is boring, so it needs a contrasting element to make it more exciting. Villains need a contrasting element too, like a hero, to make the story more alluring and enthralling. Paul is Erik’s contrasting element. He is moral, which helps make him a good contrasting element. When the big freeze came and his friends were in a time of need, Paul bravely helped them. He would help make fires for the new groves and would trek around all of the groves to help the trees all while fighting it in below freezing weather. What a hero! One cannot deny that although cowardice and self-centeredness are important ingredients, like bread without flour, like a cupcake without frosting, you cannot have a great villain without

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