Examples Of Dramatic Irony In Oedipus Rex

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Oedipus decided to leave Corinth fifteen years ago because he was told by the Oracle at Delphi that his fate showed him to eventually kill his father and marry his mother. He obviously didn’t want this to happen, so he left his town where he was brought up as a young man. He vowed never to go back because his adopted parents lived there, whom he thought were his actual birth parents. The Priest knew something was wrong with Thebes because he told Oedipus he could see the citizens huddled around temples and shrines praying, he saw the diseased crops, and saw barren women, and even all the poverty resulting in a plague in the city. The priest implored Oedipus to save Thebes from the mess it is in. He asked him because he already rescued them…show more content…
Oedipus says he will attempt to try and solve the murder mystery of Laius because he wants to avenge Apollo and Laius at the same time, wants to break the plague and disease that has fallen upon Thebes by himself, and wants to figure out who was the murderer because he could attack Oedipus any moment. First Episode: Two examples of dramatic irony in Oedipus’ speech- “Such ties swear me to his side as if he were my father.” “If anyone is out to shield a guilty friend- guilty self?- he’d better listen to the penalties I plan.” Oedipus blames Tiresias of the murder of Laius (all except the actual event because of his blindness) because he insulted Thebes and some of its people, but also said he would rather sacrifice all of its people and let the city rot then tell who he believes killed Laius. Tiresias saying, “You see and still are blind,” means that he knows that Oedipus can literally see, but he is ‘blind’ to the fact that he is the murderer of Laius, but Oedipus is far too convinced it is someone else that he doesn’t realize it. This shows the emerging theme of sight against blindness because some know exactly what is happening, but some are too ‘high up’ to actually see what is…show more content…
The thing that is at last “blazing clear” to Oedipus is who the real murderer of Laius is, himself. This statement addresses the theme of sight because after being blind to the fact for so long, Oedipus can finally see the truth. In my opinion, I do believe that Oedipus deserves to be punished for his crime of murdering Laius, because he knew that he killed him and it wasn’t accidental at all. Epilogue: Sophocles may have chosen to have the play written with the telling of Jocasta’s death and Oedipus stabbing his eyes out because back in ancient times, this may have been too gruesome to show to a large audience. Furthermore, in ancient times, no special stage effects could have been used to make the scenes seem real, while being safe. Oedipus blinds himself because he doesn’t want to see the damage he’s caused for his country and family and wants to live in darkness forever so he can’t see his failures. He doesn’t want to see his children because he believes he is an unworthy father and half-
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