Examples Of Facial Recognition

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Facial recognition is very important and it is fundamental to everyday life, humans are born to be attracted to faces and this provides us with useful information. Faces are seen as special as they provide information about people. Humans are very good at determining familiar faces and this is done through facial recognition. This essay will analyse the two cognitive models and how they can be applied to each case study. The strengths and weaknesses will be discussed as well as many examples will be included. Face Recognition is used in everyday life as people need to remember a face in their jobs or when meeting someone for the first time. Examples of practical applications are Mug shots searching, security monitoring and surveillance systems…show more content…
He has been suffering from cardiac problems and finds it difficult to recognise people, he says that he sees people as less beautiful than before (Ellis & Young, 1988). He can identify people’s features and facial expressions can still be interpreted. Mr W could pick out faces in photographs of five human and dog faces, car fronts and five house fronts. But he could not recognise any familiar faces and he is feeling very doubtful about his own (Ellis & Young, 1988). Mr W seems to have a problem with memory and not recognition itself as he can identify people but he cannot remember people. It is evident that Mr W had problems with face memory due to Ellis & Young…show more content…
It is very important to know who the face belongs to and then facial recognition will be achieved (Bruce & Young, 1986). There are seven types of information we get when looking at faces which consist of pictorial, structural, visually derived semantic, identity specific semantic, name, expression and facial codes (Bruce & Young, 1986). These factors work together to identify a face and they follow a sequence to make recognition possible (Bruce & Young, 1985). When looking at faces of people we rely on structural and pictorial codes to make the face remembered. Due to Faw (1992) it is fundamental to analyse the sex, age, size and background of a person because this helps one recognise the face at a later stage. Context is also detrimental because if one remembers the place you met someone you can trace back and remember who they are (Faw, 1992). This is evident in case 1 as the woman didn’t structurally encode the man therefore forgetting what he looked like which is a result of cross-race facial bias. It is evident in case 2 that Mr W could still recognise pictures of faces but his facial recognition is failing. This makes his semantic encoding and retrieval of name impaired because he is unable to remember his family (Ellis & Young,
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