Examples Of Free Will In 1984 By George Orwell

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Free will and control are topics portrayed time and time again within books for various different reasons. It could be used as a form of entertainment or it could be used as a way to warn people about certain dangers. In 1949 a man by the name of George Orwell decided to write a story about the second option in particular. The book was called 1984 and it was written to portray his strong opinions of government, control, free will, and other things. Orwell wrote the book to warn society about the dangers that could result from government corruption.. The way people are allowed to act, behave, and think within this book have all been predetermined due to the government’s control over everyone’s lives within this story. In the book 1984, George …show more content…

They start to always become paranoid that all of their actions are being monitored. Winston within this quote shows just how little free will all of the people have. Any sound that they make and any action that they make within the vision of the television will be recorded. Almost nothing goes unseen by the government which completely invades the privacy of all of the common people and takes away all of their free will. Orwell uses this moment to show how dangerous the conflict of having no free will truly is. Orwell then uses mood to show how horrifying it could be when people do not have control over their lives. Within the story there is a moment in which Winston expresses how truly terrifying it is to always be watched by the government. The narrator breaks character for this moment and uses a much more rapid form of speech to convey their message. People within this world did not get to live the way that they wanted to but instead “[They] had to live—did live, from habit that became instinct—in the assumption that every sound [they] made was overheard, and, except in darkness, every movement scrutinized” (Orwell 3). The narrator’s choice of words and format of the sentence differ from the previous sentence. Before the narrator used very elegant words and spoke very formally …show more content…

In the book 1984, Winston works for the Party however Winston is not very fond of the government and Big Brother. Later Winston and Julia go and sneak away from where the Party is in control and it is here where Winston is finally able to tell Julai that, “I hate purity, I hate goodness. I don’t want any virtue to exist anywhere. I want everyone to be corrupt to the bones…You like doing this? I don’t mean simply me; I mean the thing itself?” “I adore it” (Orwell 125). While Whinston works at the Ministry of Truth Winston still tells Julia that WInston loves the corruption of “innocent”/”pure” people. This ends up being very ironic as Winston works for the Party and yet hates all of the Party’s ideals and beliefs. Not only that but the Party also tries their hardest to make people “innocent” and ”pure” since the Party wants people to have no free will which shows the true importance of this scene. This scene is truly about how no matter how hard the Party tries there are still going to be people who betray the ideals and end up using their free will and become rebellious. The message that Orwell was trying to stress is that this is why dictatorships do not and will not work in the real world. It is because the people will always be rebellious and always still have their own free will to do whatever the people want to do.

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