Examples Of Human Nature In Macbeth

1223 Words5 Pages
Throughout this whole semester it seemed as if the all the novels that were assigned to read were, in some way, related to the nature of man. People would have thought about this topic before this prompt was issued because of the content, theme, and the morals each book offered their audience. They can give you enough examples in each book that they have read this semester to support the their claim, but they are only going to focus on the three most powerful examples. They would be most likely start with Macbeth. It is well aware that Macbeth was not meant to be read, so much as seen, but it could still be understood the lesson that it was meant to teach. Macbeth represents man 's need to be rich and to have control over their destinies. People…show more content…
In this novel the act of human nature would be the loss of innocence. To be easily changed and revert back into the savage in which we were before civilizations and government were imposed into the world. In the beginning of this novel a group of boys fleeing from a war torn country were shot down in their plane and stranded on an undiscovered island. All adults were killed in the crash, so the kids had to take charge. At first, all was well and Ralph stepped in as leader of the survivors. He tried to lead the boys using his knowledge of the adult world and basic necessities, but all did not last for long before Jack started to change, not only himself but the boys as well. He became the leader of the savages who had lost their innocence, having to hunt for themselves and provide for themselves. They saw the brutality that was necessary to survive in the world. When they arrived at the island all the boys were innocent, not knowing what to expect on the island, not sure what to do. By the end of the novel, they had become the definition of barbaric and fought with one another and tried to steal control from one another. They killed each other with no remorse. The change that takes place is simply amazing and can be foreseen, because without law there is only chaos. It has been proven a multitude of times with countless trials conducted by scientists. In fact, this novel was written on a test that took place in…show more content…
The act of human nature that people should want to bring out in this novel is our need for attention, our vanity. It may not sound so complicated or serious enough to bring up, but this is key in the way men naturally act. Dorian Gray is obsessed with what people think of him. To always have the limelight,being recognized by his peers. We always have to be flattered by someone else to feel valuable. People are always judging someone based on their appearance every day. Why does mankind do this? It is because it is man’s natural train of thought. It seems to be almost impossible to ignore this urge to be seen and to be approved by others. Dorian wanted to remain forever young, not necessarily to live forever, but to stay beautiful. That way others can not judge him based on his outward appearance. He cared so much for drama and plays because I am sure he loved the attention that the characters received. When he walks into the room he wants everyone to think of him as this young, dashingly handsome man. He wants this power forever. Yet he only wants to get positive attention. When he was challenged by others on his way of life he loses control and does things that make him the gossiped person in town. Gives everyone a sense of awe. Gives them something to talk about. Our need for attention rules us all. We do things that we should not
Get Access