Examples Of Impetuosity In Romeo And Juliet

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In the original play The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, two star-crossed lovers find themselves racing against death in the dangerous game of love with the aid of a corrupted Friar. The prize of endless bliss and passion would have been bestowed upon the two if they were not so reactive towards the events in the plot. The tragic flaw of impetuosity is depicted through the entire play through the actions and words of Friar Lawrence, Juliet and Romeo. The first time the reader gets a glimpse of Romeo’s impetuosity is in Scene V, Act I, where he is seen admiring Juliet from afar. In Scene I of Act I, Romeo is constantly moping about his failed romantic dream, Rosalind, but his emotions seem to take a rather sudden turn upon the appearance of Juliet. He states “It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night as a rich jewel in Ethiop’s ear– Beauty too rich for use, for Earth too dear… Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight! For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night” (Shakespeare 1.5.393). Although he has not met her in person, Romeo claims he is in love with Juliet just by…show more content…
For example, if Romeo thought about the outcome of killing Tybalt before he slew him in Act III, Scene I, he would’ve sheathed his sword and walked away. He, quite possibly, could have still been with Juliet in secret if he did not get exiled. In defense of the argument, Juliet wouldn’t have died if Romeo waited just a bit before committing suicide by poison. Both of them could have lived if Romeo waited a split second before making such a decision because Juliet would have woken up and seen Romeo by her tomb, alive and
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