Examples Of Indirect Consent

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Consent is not always risen from a direct act, it could be indirect and many philosophers have tried to get around this whole concept of indirect consent. A classic example of indirect consent, could be nationwide elections. By taking part in the elections, you are indirectly consenting to the authority of the state, because if you intend to become obligated by voting then you are allowing the state to enforce laws that should be obeyed, even though you may not always agree with them. If we do not like the laws implemented upon us, we can protest them, but this disqualifies the whole concept of a democratic state, because a state that is democratic would administer certain laws and its citizens would be obligated to obey them. What about a…show more content…
The government in many countries rarely proves itself useful and that obtains most of its power from the majority because they are the strongest group, and will always obey the government and its laws, not because they hold the most legitimate viewpoint. People's first obligation is to do what they believe is right and not to follow the law ordered by the greater mass. When a government is one that is unjust meaning, it does not have the best interests of the people, provides instability in the aid of the people, and would sacrifice its own people for economic or political gain some examples would be Nazi Germany, people should refuse to follow the law and distance themselves from that kind of government (Thoreau, 1849). Civil disobedience is the refusal to obey certain laws of governmental systems solely since you want a change in legislation or government policy, this is all done through nonviolent techniques such as boycotting. Martin Luther King says, “One has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.” If people feel as if though a certain law is infringing on their rights, they have the responsibility to ask their government for change, in a civil manner. We saw many examples of civil disobedience in South Africa, a massive campaign in the 1950s was organised to fight against unjust laws, and more recently the #FeesMustFall campaign. Many students marched against the ridiculously expensive school fees universities charge, because many deserving students cannot afford to go to university, even though we all have the right to
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