Examples Of Legacies Of The 1960s

943 Words4 Pages

Following a decade of classy and conventional living, the 1960’s was a decade filled with the Beatles, turtlenecks, Barbies, and afros. A decade where days were filled with tie dye shirts, and coloured televisions determined your social status. The 1960’s were also filled with racism and many were faced with unjust judgements and consequences for their actions. Africville, the Quiet Revolution and the official language act would prove to be remembered as legacies of these. However, through all of this emerged three events that would change Canadian history and how Canadians themselves viewed their country. Through the acceptance of a new flag, hosting of Expo 67, and fulfillment of universal health care, the 1960’s was a decade that brought …show more content…

Although, not all saw this new flag as an opportunity of unity throughout the country. Many Canadians, argued that the flag should contain a symbol of Britain, for example, the Union Jack that decades of men fought and died under. John Diefenbaker led the vicious battle against a new flag that didn’t show direct loyalty to Britain. Diefenbaker proposed that a Canadian flag must honour all of the sacrifices, courage and loss of the past generations that made Canada glorious. Otherwise these actions might be looked upon as irrelevancies or unimportant to our history. However, Lester Pearson challenged Diefenbaker's argument and supported a new flag that did not involve any symbols of the past, but to create a flag that all Canadians could connect with. After nearly 250 …show more content…

Hosting Expo 67 in Montreal was Canada's largest celebration of its 100th birthday and a large contributor of national pride. The success of Expo 67 brought French and English Canadians together with a tremendous amount of pride for their country as a whole. 120 governments were represented at the six month exposition full of technology, art and culture. Historica Canada called this expo, “ the most successful international exhibitions of the 20th Century,” in an article about the topic. Canadians could anxiously watch as the number of tourists to their country rose each day, the expo alone recorded over 55 million admissions (CE). In the end independent economic studies also stated that the Expo also brought back in return twice the amount of money that it cost the government, nearly 400 million dollars(CE). As tourists increased, many saw the brilliance and beauty of Canada that the world had not experienced before. Canadians were also proud to showcase their talents and wisdom through their newest technology, and various artforms. Canada was seen as a country completely separate from Britain which brought Canadians together as one. All Canadians, no matter their backgrounds, were proud to be Canadian after the success of Expo 67 which would be remembered around the

Open Document