Examples Of Materialism In The Great Gatsby

814 Words4 Pages

In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald uses various themes such as love, symbolism, materialism, and underlying tones to help develop the reader’s understanding of Gatsby’s fatal flaw. His fatal flaw lies in the pursuit of his dream and ideal of Daisy. He tried to win Daisy back with his newfound wealth; it got Daisy’s attention, yet it wasn’t enough. Gatsby was naive, he saw Daisy’s change in personality, he saw she only wanted to be with those who could satisfy her needs. Despite of all these detrimental signs Daisy exhibited, Gatsby wanted to still be with her, because at least he could still hold on to a glimpse of his past when things were simpler. However, the pursuit of his dream and refusal to actually see the …show more content…

He saw Daisy’s greed and love for materialistic things and not truly for him, however, refused to leave because she embodied everything he wanted out life. The best example is presented after Daisy, Nick, and Gatsby are in his house and both Daisy and Gatsby start throwing down his “shirts of sheer linen.” Daisy, awestruck with the sheer power and wealth became absorbed into this materialistic atmosphere and not with Gatsby. In that moment, Gatsby realized the dream of having Daisy was his, although, he noted Daisy’s spoiled personality and her old self was gone: “Possibly it had occurred to him that the colossal significance of that light had now vanished forever,” (Fitzgerald 122). Alluding, the green light as a metaphor to Gatsby’s long sought after dreams and desires. For the green light is nearly in his hands, yet, it is still so far away. It is so close he can almost taste it, why stop there? Although he sees Daisy’s imperfections, he neglects them and exhaustingly tries to win over her love and affection. Gatsby being the romantic hero tries to do just that and “live his life on the basis of a single romantic longing. As it belongs not to the present but to a past transfigured by imagined memory,” (Grande 1). Which in turn, means, Gatsby is refusing to accept these new attitudes and behaviors Daisy is …show more content…

For example, the eyes of Doctor T.J. Eckleburg represents the eyes of God that watch over the moral wrongdoings throughout the novel. Just as the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock represents the constantly changing imaginings of Gatsby’s dream. For instance, “Green is the color of promise, hope, and renewal,” (Millett pg. 3) and at the end of the first chapter, when Nick describes the first time he saw Gatsby lay eyes upon the light, it is clear the light represents all the hopes and desires Gatsby has for the near future. It is at this moment the reader catches a glimpse of Gatsby’s mystery. However, as the story develops, and Daisy is introduced, the audience is given clear insight to what exactly is Gatsby’s hopes for the future; meaning: the green light being so applicable to Gatsby’s dream of a future with Daisy, the green light represents Gatsby’s dreams physically. Now that Daisy is closely involved within Gatsby’s life, the green light’s meaning has changed once again. Millett makes the connection that Fitzgerald compares Gatsby’s green light to a “green breast of the new world,” (Fitzgerald 115). Implying, Gatsby’s rediscovery in Daisy is like an explorer discovering America and the hopes for a newer and brighter future for this said continent. However, Gatsby’s dream is polluted with frivolousness and materialistic ideals. Daisy, spoiled with two men, whom are both wealthy, truly wants nothing

Open Document