Examples Of Paranoia In The Crucible

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Paranoia is a great motive and a sufficient drive for people. As Newton’s law states, for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. This was the most probable case that happened in the Red Scare back in the 1950’s. This tragedy that happened began with a United States Senator James McCarthy and the House Un-American Activities proclaiming and dictating that Communists had infiltrated the government and even society as well. Arthur Miller, the author of The Crucible began with the pretense that these trials were more or less something of a comical sense. After witnessing all the prosecutions and how all the reputations were being ruined at the time, Miller himself began believing that this misfortune was actually a reality. In his time, Miller wrote The Crucible as an allegory to portray the Communist trials and to reveal to the people how this madness was taking over their fundamental society. Throughout Miller 's article “Were You Now or Were You Ever?” he uses a competent tone, parallelism and repetition reflecting paranoia, and the use of an…show more content…
Miller asserts that the Communist trials pertain to a hysteria that was an unforeseen delusion and a source of controversy through the use of a competent tone, parallelism and repetition reflecting paranoia, and lastly an abstract diction. The Communist trials of the 1950’s are best represented by the allegory of The Crucible at its finest, and yet the people did not catch on to its ideas, the sense that Miller emphasizes an illusion is susceptible to reality in his argument is a very simple conclusion. The extent to which the Communist trials traveled and to the point where it stopped is still at large unbelievable, but at least that time in history is gone … or is
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