Examples Of Plagiarism In Huckleberry Finn

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The author reminds us of important details when she tells the audience to “READ THIS!!!! Before you begin to answer any of these questions, you MUST make your own Document. To do this, choose FILE, then MAKE A COPY. Delete the words “COPY OF” from the beginning of the title, and add your last name to the END of the title (this will allow your submission to sort by class, and will make me very happy!” (Singley 1). The speaker also notifies us to “Remember: These are due in Turnitin no later than midnight, December 9th. Please also turn in a printed copy that day as well. NOTE: these are due at the beginning of class. Please plan accordingly!” (Singley 1). Finally, the speaker emphasizes a standard of plagiarism in saying that an “Originality …show more content…

First of all this quote gives the reader insight into the language and slang of the setting. Any respectable speaker of correct English knows that Pap grammatically should say “tan you well” (unless he means to tan him to become “good,” but that’s still a specifically dictated phrase to match Pap’s language), and that is the locution Clemens implements in the novel to match the era, much like the frequently-used “n-word.” In addition, the diction Clemens emulates in Pap is expressed in his use of the word “tan,” a slang term for repeatedly beating someone, slang that matches the setting of the novel and sets the tone for the character of Pap. Lying beyond the explicit intricacies in this example are the inherent ironies in it. The fact that Pap enforces his son’s right to not get an education is the exact opposite of what one would think, and it is implied that Pap sees religion as even worse. This is slightly more understandable because Clemens portrays Pap as mostly unsophisticated; it makes sense for him to be against the idea of an already-egocentric thirteen-year-old trying to preach his religion on him. In Pap’s language Clemens gives the reader an image of a similar father warning his son to do exactly the opposite, to go to school, but he puts this sense into the context of Pap’s views, dramatizing the situational irony. 2. How does …show more content…

Huck goes by canoe along the river, and later he finds himself “looking away into the sky; not a cloud in it. The sky looks ever so deep when you lay down on your back in the moonshine; [Huck] never knowed it before” (37). When Huck escapes and canoes down the river, the nonchalant Mississippi exactly reflects Huck’s state of mind. This also continues Huck’s desire to be free to do what he wishes, which he is now. As he discovers Jim, the sense of a free lifestyle

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