Examples Of Prejudicial Thinking In To Kill A Mockingbird

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Prejudicial thinking is a prevalent facet of contemporary and past life; its influence can be found all throughout literature, in the classic To Kill a Mockingbird (TKAM) and modern text Jasper Jones. The film adaptation of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mocking Bird is a timeless example of challenging the mold; its use of strong moral characters faced with prejudiced based situations that strongly oppose not only their beliefs but also the audience is unbelievably powerful. Its artful construction and representation of the 1930’s way of thinking during the Great Depression is a compelling argument in terms of bringing to light the inconsistencies and unfair treatment of those considered less. The novel Jasper Jones by Craig Silvey is a contemporary …show more content…

In the film adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird, Boo Radley was the most prominent character that fit the outsider archetype because of the stigma against mental illness. The community of Maycomb demonise him and label him insane, constructing an image of him as being huge and menacing and evil; Jem, a young boy says to his friend Dill describing Boo, “He’s about six and a half feet tall. He eats raw squirrels and all the cats he can catch. There’s a long, jagged scar that runs all the way across his face. His teeth are yellow and rotten. His eyes are popped, and he drools most of the time.” This quote highlights the fear felt by Maycomb as adults close to Jem have instilled fear in him towards a man he has never meet, seen when Miss Stephanie reiterates, “There’s a maniac lives there and he’s dangerous.” Scout the narrator of the film is viewed as a reasonable person yet her ideas are …show more content…

In both narratives, nobody seeks to challenge any of the rumours surrounding the outsiders which is the texts greatest downfall. These omissions subtly reinforce prejudicial thinking however, Charlie’s use of those rumours to advance himself in the community and Boo Radley’s absolute desire to remain unknown is the reason that Jasper Jones’ portrayal of prejudice is less impactful than that of To Kill a Mocking Bird. Both texts were products of their time, Harper Lee’s representation of racism and stigma was revolutionary during the 1960’s. Silvey’s modern interpretation of the same issues was similarly influenced by the time however, the novel was published in 2009 a far less conservative period. Harper Lee’s classic narrative successfully and purposefully exposes and questions prejudicial thinking in a close-minded town. The portrayal of Boo Radley as an outsider was incredibly powerful at showcasing prejudice and condemning it. Jasper Jones impact on the audience was less pronounced regarding Mad Jack Lionel yet it still conveyed the same ideals, the alienation of a person who has excluded them self is detrimental to everybody ignorant enough to believe that those who are different from them are

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