Examples Of Resilience In Oedipus The King

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Clarisse Santos S. Stamp ENG4UQ 12 July 2023 Title Every individual encounters difficulties that alter their viewpoints on life and their willingness to navigate these pressures. Therefore, it is essential to recover and acclimate oneself in the presence of tragedy in order to develop a sense of strength and resilience. This trait of resilience is demonstrated through the play of Shakespeare's Hamlet, which follows Prince Hamlet; he struggles with the death of his father and the abrupt marriage of his mother to his uncle, and is given the responsibility of getting revenge for his uncle’s transgressions. Similarly, in Sophocles' play Oedipus the King, Oedipus shows his efforts of resilience when he is tasked with finding the murderer of the …show more content…

Hamlet puts into practice his own free will rather than solely relying on fate when he is given the opportunity to kill Claudius and take revenge for his father when he finds him praying. However, he says "And am I then revenged / To take him in the purging of his soul / When he is fit and seasoned for his passage? / No!" (3.3.87-90). Hamlet contemplates revenge at this moment and its potential effects as he realizes that killing Claudius while he is repenting for his sins might send him to heaven. Instead, he wants to catch him committing a sin that would denounce him to hell. As a result, Hamlet is able to show his resilience by waiting for a more suitable moment to trap Claudius instead of seeking immediate gratification; this demonstrates his ability to think about the long-term consequences. As well as showcases his control over his actions and his willingness to resist his desires rather than believing that this is fate's given opportunity for him to kill Claudius while he is …show more content…

To illustrate, Hamlet questions the honesty of the ghost and wants to find more evidence:“Yea, and perhaps / Out of my weakness and my melancholy, / As he is very potent with such spirits, / Abuses me to damn me. I’ll have grounds. / More relative than this” (2.2.604-608). Hamlet displays an understanding of the potential consequences of his actions. He does not blindly trust the ghost’s words and does not act on his emotion; instead, he makes an effort to verify his suspicions. His resilience is demonstrated by his avoidance of impulsive actions and wanting to have justifiable “grounds” before acting on his

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