Examples Of Social Issues In To Kill A Mockingbird

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To Kill a Mockingbird When strained from needed resources, one will resort to less ethical ways to survive. This may result in one becoming less commonly connected with others. Bob Ewell in the book, To Kill a Mockingbird, he has been impaired financially due to the events of the Great Depression. He resorts to less morally correct methods of obtaining needed resources. Harper Lee’s novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, accurately argues that economically strained families have impaired social ability, and begin to lose morals. Families that have a poor grasp on economic stability, have a loose connection with society. The Cunninghams of Maycomb, are farmers that were hit hard by both the dust bowl, and the stock market crash. Mr. Cunningham has…show more content…
This shows when an individual or a family is strained financially, it is common to see social behavior to become repressed, along with other things, but fear of financial embarrassment. Harper Lee’s accurate use of how the Cunninghams use an alternate way of payment of service, connects to the issue of poverty in the early 20th Century. These social problems may not be self-inflicted. When Walter Cunningham is playing with his friend Scout, like ordinary children, but the idea can be very unordinary to others, like Aunt Alexandra. Aunt Alexandra discovers the relationship between Walter Cunningham and her niece, Scout. Aunt Alexandra being the social butterfly she is, disproves the idea of Scout hanging out with a poor farmer’s boy. In an act of prejudice, Aunt Alexandra forbids Scout from any boyish behavior to prevent Scout from having any social connections with Walter Cunningham. Scout argues with Aunt Alexandra about inviting Walter Cunningham to dinner, but Aunt Alexandra insists that Scout does not do such a thing. “their is no [doubt] in Aunt Alexandra’s mind that the…show more content…
The Ewells are known by the community of Maycomb for being financially strained and ones who don’t abide by the laws and social morals. Bob Ewell emitted to the government for welfare. Instead of using the money for food and clothing for his family, Bob Ewell uses the money for self-desires. This fact of Bob Ewell is known around Maycomb but because of the people’s sorrow for his hungry children, citizens of Maycomb ignore the illegal acts done by Bob Ewell, such as hunting out of season. When Atticus makes Scout aware of what Bob Ewell has done, they both discuss the situation and Atticus becomes outrages, and blurts “it’s certainly bad, but when a man spends his relief checks on green [whiskey], his [children] have a way of [crying] from hunger pains”(Lee 41). Harper Lee uses the decisions Bob Ewell makes on the use of his welfare, to illustrate the extent of Bob Ewell harsh actions. Harper Lee use of “whiskey” and “children” to emphasize how horrible Bob Ewell is, and to also show that Mr. Ewell’s incorrect parenting acts, going against human morals of nurturing one’s children. Harper Lee’s description of the state of being for the Ewell kids, that Bob Ewell essentially sat and drank $3.80 per shot of whiskey. Harper Lee uses “crying;” emphasize the pain Bob Ewell’s children are suffering. Harper Lee uses this event to illustrate to the reader that Bob Ewell is a
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