Examples Of Sociopathy In Othello

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The Sociopathy of Othello’s Iago
Luke Wakumoto

(1.) One of the more common and well known traits of sociopathy is being a superficial Charmer. That is, someone who tends to be smooth and charming to get what they want. Iago uses this type of charm many times throughout the story, though this is most notable when uses it to pretend to ally with Othello, and when he convinces Roderigo to try to kill Cassio. (2.) Iago, who had just been denied The Sociopathy of Othello’s Iago
Luke Wakumoto

(1.) One of the more common and well known traits of sociopathy is being a superficial Charmer. That is, someone who tends to be smooth and charming to get what they want. Iago uses this type of charm many times throughout the story, though this is most notable
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The amount of times this trait has been displayed by Iago is too many to count, though the most notable examples include when Iago cleverly plants a seed of doubt regarding Cassio’s intentions in Othello’s mind and when Iago told Othello to strangle Desdemona in her bed rather than poison her. (2.) Cassio and Desdemona are talking casually in a building as Iago stands idly by, waiting for the perfect moment to start his scheme to get revenge on Othello. (3.) As Cassio leaves and Othello enters, Othello asks Iago if it was Cassio who had just left the company of Desdemona; Cassio responds: “Cassio, my lord? No, sure, I cannot think it that he would steal away so guiltylike [sic], seeing your coming”(III.III.41-43). (4.) In this display of intelligence, Iago is cleverly using reverse psychology to plant a very small, but still present, thought that maybe Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona. This is especially important as it kick-starts the rest of the plan of revenge. (3.) Much later in the play, when Iago finally convinces Othello to kill Desdemona, Iago makes another clever decision when he suggested a method of committing the murder as an alternative to using poison: “ Do it not with poison. Strangle her in her bed, even the bed she hath contaminated” (IV.I.226-227). (4.) Iago is suggesting that Othello should…show more content…
Iago, during the play, displays a notable lack of remorse or guilt for the many horrendous deeds he commits. This is seen twice in the scenes where Iago is confronted about his devilish plan. (2.) After Othello kills Desdemona and reveals to Emilia that it was Iago who convinced him about the affair. This causes Emillia to start to realize her husband’s plans. (3.) As Iago enters the scene of the murder, Emilia openly asks Iago if he told Othello that Desdemona was cheating on him; Iago responds thusly: “I told him what I thought, and told no more than what he found himself was apt and true” (V.II.212-213). (4.) Iago is stating that Iago just told Othello what he knew and what made sense (which is obviously not true). The fact that he could so blatantly lie about what had occurred when it resulted in the death of an innocent person goes to show how unremorseful he was about his actions and about taking an innocent life. (3) Later, when Iago is promptly caught after fleeing the scene, he is interrogated by Othello about his scheme. Iago arrogantly responds with the following: “ Demand me nothing. What you know, you know. From this time forth I never will speak word. (V.II.355-356).(4.) Iago is, for as unusual as it is for a Shakespearean villain, refusing to reveal his motives for his evil plan. This final act of defiance does nothing
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