Examples Of Superstition In Macbeth

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Superstition is “a belief or way of behaving that is based on fear of the unknown and faith in magic or luck,” or “a belief that certain events of things will bring good or bad luck.” (Merriam-Webster’s Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary) Macbeth by William Shakespeare is one of the book which describes superstitions and supernatural powers well. In Macbeth, Macbeth gets a prophecy, which he will be a king, from three witches, kills the King of Scotland and becomes a king. Even though he feels guilt, he tries to maintain the crown. At the end, the prince of Scotland and the nobles invade against Macbeth, and Macduff kills him. Supernatural forces in Macbeth, such as the three witches and their prophecies, cause Macbeth to murder the king, Duncan, and to embark on a path that ultimately leads to further tragedy. Superstition is “a belief or a way of behaving that is based on fear of the unknown and faith in magic or luck” or “a belief that certain events of things will bring good or bad luck.” First, Macbeth…show more content…
Unlike the prophecies though, these visions don’t seem to goad Macbeth into taking a specific action. Instead, they remind of the horror of what he is about to do or what he has done. When Macbeth was heading to Duncan’s room to murder him, he saw “a dagger of the mind, a false creation” (2.1.53), which handle points him. The dagger move forward to the duncan’s room, and suddenly, “on thy blade and dudgeon, gouts of blood, which was not so before.” (2.1.53) Not even showing what he will going to do, the dagger helps Macbeth to ask himself what he is going to do and think about what will happen if he use the real dagger to kill Duncan; he torn between the temptation to be king and the potential guilt of the murder. Even though he became a king, he sees a illusion of the ghost of

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