Fahrenheit 451: An Analysis

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In Fahrenheit 451, we can see that through characters thoughts, dialogue, and reactions in certain situations can reveal a lot about them. For instance, Mildred, Montag’s wife, lives in what is suppose to be a utopian society where everyone is happy and content, but Mildred is very unhappy with her life, as we can see when she attempts suicide. Mildred tries to convince herself that she is happy with her boring life which just consists of watching television all day and she denies the fact that she attempted to commit suicide. When Guy Montag is talking to Mildred about her television obsession he says, “Will you turn the parlour off?” and Mildred responded by saying,"That's my family" revealing the detachment from reality she has. (Bradbury…show more content…
(Bradbury 78) Similar to Mildred’s mindset is Beatty, who is a fireman that works with Montag. For instance, he reminds Montag of the importance of burning books by saying, "The important thing for you to remember, Montag, is we're the Happiness Boys... you and I and the others. We stand against the small tide of those who want to make everyone unhappy with conflicting theory and thought. We have our fingers in the dike. Hold steady. Don't let the torrent of melancholy and drear philosophy drown our world" revealing that he believed that if people were allowed to read books, then there would be many problem and people would be unhappy, which is very ironic considering significant amounts of people are committing suicide everyday. (Bradbury 62) In Part II of Fahrenheit 451, Montag seeks Faber's help,a retired English teacher, and Montag want to get his bible reprinted. As Faber and Montag are talking Faber tells Montag, "Those who don't build must burn. It's as old as history and juvenile delinquents" meaning that those who cannot contribute to society are the ones who feel the need to tear it down. (Bradbury

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