Faith Ringgold Analysis

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Faith Ringgold; African-American Artist April S. Merritt October 10, 2015 Professor Susan Harmon Fine Arts Appreciation Faith Ringgold was born on October 8, 1930. She was born in New York City, New York and was later raised in Harlem, New York. Information about Faith Ringgold can be found on pages 17 and 345 of the textbook. Additional information on Faith Ringgold was also located on www.faithringgold.com and www.britannica.com. Ringgold’s primary media was oil on canvas and more notably, acrylic on canvas. The work of Faith Ringgold’s For the Women’s House, 1971 is located at Rose M. Singer Center, New York. Another piece of hers, Tar Beach, 1988 is located at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Faith Ringgold was given the name…show more content…
All attention seems to be drawn to the central focus of the piece. The female represented has a rather large and bright hat which also draws my attention almost immediately to their presence. The composition of this narrative quilt seems almost proportionately planned. Evenly spread throughout the piece is two larger groups or families which yield the outer most corners of the left and right of the artwork. The same technique is used in the lower left and right corners although the groups of persons standing around in the picnic are significantly smaller. The perspective of the artwork is flat. There seems to be little to no depth involved. The flat view of the artwork looks almost candid in relation to the way the bodies are formed with little complexity and vivacious colors. When referring to subject matter once more, I notice the colors. The colors and display immediately conveys the impression of a presumably pleasurable time as noted by the smiling faces, and the dancing unified within the piece. Many of the figures drawn have opened arms which feel warm and…show more content…
K. (2006). Ringgold, Faith. In C. A. Palmer (Ed.), Encyclopedia of African-American Culture and History (2nd ed., Vol. 5, pp. 1949-1950). Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3444701090&v=2.1&u=txshracd2491&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w&asid=2e62ce157d50aeef7b654cb257627d3b Faith Ringgold. (2004). In Encyclopedia of World Biography (2nd ed., Vol. 13, pp. 175-177). Detroit: Gale. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3404705480&v=2.1&u=txshracd2491&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w&asid=45b7150cd2f0fccb2130dc5096ca9c36 Jackson Pollock. (2004). In Encyclopedia of World Biography (2nd ed., Vol. 12, pp. 379-380). Detroit: Gale. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3404705191&v=2.1&u=txshracd2491&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w&asid=eaf5a5dc2e855348a908095031bb47ff Lynch, S. F., & Lynch, R. L., Jr. (2006). Impressionism. In T. Quirk & G. Scharnhorst (Eds.), American History Through Literature 1870-1920 (Vol. 2, pp. 504-508). Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3470800113&v=2.1&u=txshracd2491&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w&asid=2d4f7e6152a1f4d4bdc8fd974f685ffd Happening. (2015). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved from
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