Family Genogram Case Study

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McGoldrick, Gerson, & Petry (1985) define family as “those who are tied together through their common biological, legal, cultural, and emotional history and by their implied future together”. It is one of the most powerful systems we as humans will belong to (Carter & McGoldrick, 2005, as cited in McGoldrick et. al 1985). Murray Bowen, a psychiatrist, was one of the developers of mainstream family therapy (Corey, 2008). Bowen defined the family system as an emotional system and a principle driving force in the development of clinical problems (Kerr, 2000). It is important to understand both the current and historical context of the family and the genogram allows us to do just that. A wealth of information can be gleaned from my family…show more content…
Relationship patterns and roles within the family altered simultaneously. My Mother assumed the role of provider and my maternal grandmother joined the system, stepping in as caretaker. The two oldest siblings were at boarding school and mostly absent from the family unit during my early years. John, became the “black sheep”, following on to the army after boarding school. On the few occasions, my sister Mary was present, she assumed a maternal and nurturing role. Richard the middle child assumed the position of eldest and became the family hero or as we called him the “golden child”. Cormac became the Mascot, funny and distracting, anything for a laugh, especially during times of stress. I, the youngest slipped into the role of the Lost child, shy and quiet and attaching more easily to things rather than…show more content…
Cut-offs may reduce tension initially, nevertheless, problems still remain unresolved. For many years, my eldest brother used cut-off as a means of coping with emotional issues. Today, he lives in the U.K. and only visits occasionally and for short periods of time, unable to cope with being around family for long periods of time. There appears to be unresolved attachment, as he feels my mother never understood him or approved of him. Perhaps understandable as much of his early years were spent at boarding school and then the army which in turn became a substitute family for
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