Fard Nation Of Islam

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The nation of Islam emerged in the year of 1929, the year Timothy Drew died (Hine 528). After Drew’s death a modified version of the Moorish Science Temple emerged in Detroit, led by a door to door peddling silk while spreading the message that he was a prophet sent by Allah to teach African Americans their true heritage, known as Wallace D. Fard also known by the names of Master Fard Muhammad and Wali Fard came about with the Nation of Islam in 1930. The Nation of Islam was also well known through Malcolm X as well. The Nation of Islam may have meant several things to African Americans at the time but the actual definition of Nation of Islam was a religious movement that combined Islam with black nationalism (Hine G-4). The Nation of Islam …show more content…

Fard exhorted blacks to “return” to Islam, which Fard Nation of Islam characterized as “religion of their ancestors”. By 1934 the Detroit temple had at least 8,000 members and the latter was later sent to Chicago to establish a second Nation of Islam temple. The Nation of Islam temples also spread to Milwaukee, Washington D.C. and other major cities. Like Fard there were other who supported Nation of Islam and there were also others who supported different beliefs or groups that were created to help African Americans. For instance, Marcus Garvey and his UNIA (Universal Negro Improvement Association) that pretty much advocated black self-reliance and that they should return to Africa. Malcolm X was also known as firm believer and supporter of the Nation of Islam. In fact, Malcolm X joined the Nation of Islam while imprisoned and later became a spokesperson for the Nation of Islam even though he had a different approach to it compared to both Elijah Muhammed and Wallace …show more content…

The Nation of Islam not only affected the lives of blacks reading the text it also speaks on Muhammad Ali and also how the Nation of Islam affected rap in the Bronx when it came about. In fact understanding the fast expansion of the Nation of Islam, one must look to the communities in which it thrived. Detroit, like other northern and mid-western cities, had experienced a rapid influx of African Americans from the rural South; they were drawn northward in search of new economic opportunities and an escape from lynching and segregation. Starting in the 1920s, the process reached a height during the boom years of World War

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