Fast Fashion Case Study

795 Words4 Pages
FAST FASHION IS OVER…SLOW FASHION IS TAKING THE LEAD “Fast fashion isn’t free. Someone, somewhere is paying” Lucy Siegle Being able to buy five pieces of clothing from fast fashion brands for the same price as one or two ethically made, usually organic, pieces from a trusted company can be a tough decision when on a budget. While it is one issue that Fast Fashion clothes are created from unsustainable materials, it’s our consumption of them which is worrying. In some ways the industrial revolution was responsible for the way we produce clothing today. It’s difficult to imagine the sewing innovations and textile factories of the 1800s were paving the way to mass production and overconsumption. As it became more expensive to produce clothing…show more content…
The slow movement is not only linked to fashion, but is a cultural revolution in modern society. Slow Fashion wearers are conscious about where their clothes are sourced. The alternative to the industry’s dominant business model is led by new, upcoming fashion designers who want to promote sustainability and durability to encourage ethical and mindful purchases. In a world of 52 “micro-seasons” and wearing an outfit more than once is a fashion “don’t”, consumers want convenience, and for the lowest price. However “Surveys indicate that consumers will accept a higher price for clothing that comes with an ethical guarantee.” With the boycotting of big fast fashion retailers and the “vintage” resurgence, we are now recognizing the impact that clothing can make on society. Companies that practice the ethical manufacturing of their clothing, ensure the workers are in a safe environment and are paid a fair wage. Retailers be accused of exploiting workers and abusing the environment, simply because they follow the fast fashion business model. Fashion is a business and high street retailers need to respond to the needs of their…show more content…
Are the clothes made domestically? In developing countries? Are measures taken to compensate workers fairly? To ensure their safety? If the clothes are handmade, traded fairly, made domestically or manufactured with pride in the process, that will be explicitly stated. Companies that invest time, energy and resources to produce their clothing ethically go out of their way to make sure you know about it. 3. MATERIALS: CONSIDER THE CLOTHING’S FIBER COMPOSITION. Given the volume of clothing produced each year, the material composition of our clothes takes a heavy toll on the environment. The fashion industry is one of the most destructive industries, falling into second place behind the oil industry. Sustainable brands are aware of these challenges and take active measures to use more responsible materials like linen, hemp and organic cotton. Companies might also use vintage or dead stock material to lessen their environmental impact. Applying these criteria to your next purchase is where the fun really begins. You can gather information, reach out to companies with questions and make your own decisions about whether a company deserves your support. There’s so much power and possibility in
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