Romeo And Juliet's Mistakes

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Shakespearean romance tragedy Romeo and Juliet is easily one of the most famous plays in the history of English literature. However, there still remains a mystery centuries later that has not yet been determined for certain: Were Romeo and Juliet’s deaths caused by fate or was it their own mistakes that led them to their deaths? This goal of this essay is to convince the readers that it was indeed fate that led Romeo to kill himself. And the play has many proofs of that, including coincidence, margin for error, and love.
The amount of coincidence in the play proves that fate had control in Romeo and Juliet, as the characters were ignorant and couldn’t prevent these coincidences. For example, Friar John ends up in quarantine for the having been
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Again, the fact that Friar John was quarantined shows how just the tiniest error, like going to the wrong friend to join you on a journey, can ruin all plans. (Shakespeare 5.2) In this scene, Friar Laurence explains how it’s very dangerous that the letter was not sent, as Romeo then has no idea that Juliet isn’t really dead and that she is faking her death. This, of course, leads to Romeo’s death, and then shortly after, Juliet’s death. What was supposed to be a plan to escape and live happily ever after as a married couple, goes horribly wrong and ends in the deaths of the two people the plan was made for in the first place. Another somewhat minor mistake that changes the future is Romeo and Juliet’s mistake to pursue their love. Romeo and Juliet may be madly in love right from the start, but it wouldn’t have killed them to forget the idea of a forbidden love. “Holy Saint Francis, what a change is here! / Is Rosaline, whom thou [Romeo] didst love so dear, / So soon forsaken? Young men’s love then lies / Not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes” (Shakespeare 2.3.65-68). Friar Laurence strongly disapproves here, before reluctantly agreeing to marry Romeo and Juliet in secret. “Is she [Juliet] a Capulet? / O dear account! My [Romeo’s] life is my foe’s debt” (Shakespeare 1.5.117-118). Romeo admits here that he should have nothing to do with Juliet because she is…show more content…
Although mistakes are made, many of the events in this play couldn’t have been prevented, as the characters had no way of telling the future and had no psychic abilities. Therefore, the coincidence, the margin for error, and the love all support that fate played a major part in Romeo’s
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