Meaning In Faulkner's Literature

2014 Words9 Pages
As far as the play of language produces meaning from differance, meaning arises from the lack of authoritative, unique, absolute or central significance. In both their plots and their themes, Faulkner's novels often appear bereft of conclusive sense. The author whose literary ambition is to “leave a scratch on that wall - Kilroy was here” (Faulkner in the University 61) discovers the meaning of his works during the course of their composition. Meaning must await being said or written in order to inhabit itself, and in order to become, by differing from oneself what it is: meaning... It is because writing is inaugural, in the fresh sense of the word, that it is dangerous and anguishing. It does not know where it is going...,” Derrida remarks.…show more content…
One of her crucial goals is to emphasize Derrida's gesture of erasure, his attempt to use words while denying their metaphysical assumptions. Derrida's reading of Nietzsche notices that his paradoxes are forms of erasure: Derrida finds Nietzsche to have contributed to the liberation of the signifier from its reliance on the signified. Derrida extends Nietzsche's destruction of conventional oppositions such as good and evil, truth and error, theory and practice, death and life etc. Nietzsche anticipates the gesture or erasure, then, in attempting to speak the destruction of metaphysics within the language of…show more content…
The novel explores the ideas of art and language rather than pursuing story telling or narrative technique thereby making sex, language and art its dominant themes. In this sense, Cleanth Brooks calls the novel “ ‘literary’, ‘talky’, ‘experimental’ ” (William Faulkner: Toward Yoknapatawpha and Beyond 129). The novel offers fresh insights on how Faulkner thinks about language by arranging repeated conversations about arts, language and theories of
Open Document