Fear In Romeo And Juliet

751 Words4 Pages
Although ultimately leading to their death, the prevailing love between Romeo and Juliet is the catalyst that mends their family’s feud. The powerful ending in this play that Shakespeare creates aligns with Aristotle’s definition of tragedy by “effecting the proper purgation of these emotions [catharsis]" such as pity and fear. The first time we experience fear is when Juliet and Romeo realize they are enemies and we fear the repercussions of this relationship. This is specifically a formidable problem because their families are ancient enemies. At the Capulet party, when Romeo is found out to be a Montague, Tybalt yells, “Now, by the stock and honor of my kin,/To strike him dead I hold it not a sin” (Tybalt 1.5.66-67). This quote generates a lot of fear for Romeo’s life and for the future of Romeo and Juliet’s relationship: “My only love sprung from my only hate!" (Juliet 1.5.152) This tension between the two characters adds to the feelings of pity and…show more content…
Both Juliet and Romeo experience this feeling when Romeo becomes banished from Verona. The last time Romeo sees Juliet alive, his grief is affirmed with his line, “More light and light, more dark and dark our woes” (Romeo 3.5.36). He is expected to be gone by daylight, but the two lovers are clutching onto their last moments together. This love that has brought the two main characters together has, in some sense, made them foolish. Juliet would rather die than to be with another man, “If all else fail, myself have power to die” (Juliet 3.5.255). This intense display of affection allows the pity to be bound with Juliet’s character as we see her slowly
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