Standpoint Feminism In Schools

1906 Words8 Pages
Standpoint Feminism School rules can be analyzed through a standpoint feminism lens by focusing on how the school rules perpetuate the marginalization and discrimination of girls in the school system. Although rules are meant to be neutral, how they are applied often favorites male over female students. For example, in schools that do not require a uniform, males benefit from dress code rules (Raby, 2012). There are very few dress code rules that apply specifically to male students, whereas there are an abundance of rules that govern how female students are allowed to dress. Girls are required to buy shorts that meet certain length requirements, as well as buy tank tops that have straps of a specific width, both of which may be impossible,…show more content…
Teachers are obligated to inform the students of the school rules on the first day of school every year. From that point on, teachers are expected to enforce the rules, whether or not they agree with all of them. When teachers do not agree with the rules, they run the risk of creating inconsistencies between classes. This can create problems for the teacher when students use that teachers name when they get caught breaking rules in other classes. A lack of consistency between teachers and classrooms can lead to favoritism and discrimination (Raby, 2012). While only a third of teachers believe that favoritism in the classroom occurs, students in Raby’s (2012) study regarded favoritism as a normal part of attending school. For instance, students noted that “certain students are favoured by some teachers and administrators and others are not” (Raby, 2012, p. 117). Students found that this favoritism was generally based on how students were dressed (e.g. whether or not they looked to belong to a lower SES) or their extracurricular activities. When enforcing rules, especially the more minor rules, such as the no hat rule, students may begin to dislike certain teachers (Raby, 2012). This can lead to a negative teaching experience for the teacher, but it could also impact students’ learning if they spend more time disliking the teacher than focusing on the material that is being…show more content…
Students could likely receive more benefits from school rules if they were included in the rule making process. This would provide students with a greater sense of agency in their education, especially because of how many hours of their lives they spend attending school. Raby (2012) believed that “students…value relationships with teachers. They seek respect, trust, patience, communication, clear limits, and some degree of choice” (p. 48), thus involving students in the rule making process could benefit both staff and students alike. Overall, there are many factors that influence school rules, such as power, gender, socioeconomic status and the moral beliefs of the rule makers. Students are often negatively impacted by the rules as they do not believe many of them are fair, and they have no say in creating the rules that govern them for the number of years they spend in school. School rules could be more beneficial if their origins and impacts were confronted. Students rarely question what rules they approve or disapprove of and where these rules come from, though doing so could change how the rules are understood and
Open Document