Feminism In The Metamorphosis

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Feminism is the advocacy of women 's rights on the basis of the equality of the sexes and is a movement for the equality of women politically and socially. Throughout history, women have been degraded for the importance and contribution to society, therefore giving women the image of a 'weak ' figure and only need in society is to take care of men. However, as exemplified in Kafka 's "the Metamorphosis," women begin to develop a stronger role of importance not only as the providers, but as the voice of opinions and critique. The Metamorphosis tells of a sexist society based on the idea that women are the weaker sex taking care of one thing: men 's needs, all in while men provide for the household as a whole. In "the Metamorphosis, Kafka uses…show more content…
Gregor is the main provider within the family for the amount of income he brings, and is idolized for his role. Being raised in the 20th century, Gregor 's view on women had been the same as any other male during this time period and looked down upon women as inadequate, and, in most societies, the man provides and the woman maintains; however, this viewpoint alternates once the unexpected change in their life occurs resulting in a switch of leadership within their household. "Gregor felt very proud that he had been able to provide such a life in so nice an apartment for his parents and his sister. (21)" After his mysterious modification within his physical form, his mentality also weakened. He became embodied by his weak form and closed off to the real world, literally. Gregor’s influence on his family also allowed his father to grow as an individual and appear superior when dressing within his…show more content…
Growing up in a community with an unequal view of women, Grete has been influenced by the idea that her knowledge is of no importance. Grete had been looked down upon by her family for her lack of a stance and her position in society. However, Gregor’s transformation forces Grete to make up for his shortcomings, pushing her out of her comfort zone as well as her ideal gender role. Given the circumstances, Grete gives up her simple, easy lifestyle to make up for the loss of Gregor. In the beginning, Gregor depicts Grete using degrading terms to explain his sister, which suggests that her role as a female falls below his status as a male. "His sister, who at seventeen was still a child, and whose lifestyle up to that point consisted of dressing herself neatly, sleeping late… taking part in a few modest pleasures, and above all playing the violin” (407). Grete is viewed as innocent and incapable of doing things independently, but roles switch between the two and, instead, is the one who makes the decisions within the family and by using Grete’s reactions after Gregor’s transformation to reveal the boundaries that limit growth in a society with specific gender roles. (To be
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