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Figurative Language In Cherrylog Road

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poem there is a whole different meaning to the poem. Just like a well-made cake the top layer of cake is not the same as bottom piece of cake. Take into example this stanza from the poem “And to get back there with no trace of me on her face. To be seen by her red-haired father, who would change in the squalling barn .Her back’s pale skin with a strop, and then lay for me (Dickey).” “To get back there with no trace of me on her face,” this can be interpreted as that Doris would be able to get back to the farm safely without her father knowing that she was with a boy in the junk yard. “To be seen by her red-haired father, who would change in the squalling barn,” as a reader this was interpreted as if her father really saw what was going on, he was going to change his attitude in the barn .” “Her back’s pale skin with a strop, and then lay for me,” the final sentence can be interpreted various ways. Personally the sentence was interpreted as her pale skin would be beaten with a strop and then the father would lay there waiting for the male narrator that was with his daughter. This is how the poem Cherrylog Road delivers its meaning by symbolism, figurative language, and hidden themes throughout the passages. As a reader to fully understand…show more content…
A symbol that stood out the most as a reader of the poem, was the symbolism of the old cars and scrap metal in the junk yard. In the junk yard there are numerous old cars and pieces of scrap metal. Although the pieces of scrap metal and cars are old from the time that they have sat in the junk yard, they are all still alive with their past. The metal and cars represent the two rebellious teenagers because their secret encounters will too soon become a memory like the metal and cars. The only thing that will be left of
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