Figurative Language In Poetry

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"To think or speak poetically is to adopt a distorted stance toward the ordinary world..." and to do so is with the use of figurative language (Gibbs 1). Figurative language is the point at which you utilize a word or expression that does not make use of its literal meaning. Authors who utilize figurative language, use this to make their work more fascinating or more emotional than the exact language which essentially states simple facts. Authors frequently use figurative language to make unfamiliar things, settings and circumstances more relatable for the reader. Poems, specifically, depend intensely on figurative language. For example, similes, metaphors, hyperbole, and personification in poems is used to make the persona and his environment…show more content…
Figurative language takes many different forms in linguistics and literature. Figures of speech, for example, similes, metaphors, and allusions go past the literal meaning of the word to give the readers new experiences and insight. In addition, alliterations, imageries, or onomatopoeias are figurative devices that speak to the senses of the readers such as auditory, kinesthetic, olfactory, visual, and gustatory. Figurative language can show up in various structures with the utilization of various artistic and rhetorical devices. Then again, what makes an effective use of figurative language? First, is its appeal to the senses and the mood. Figurative language can influence the state of mind of the reader of a poem. The term mood alludes to the climate that envelops the reader and brings out specific emotions. Figurative language is utilized to draw the reader into the poem…show more content…
Figurative language can then be used to clarify conceptual feelings. Through engaging one’s creative energy, the author is making productive use of figurative language. Through this procedure, the author can express what is on his mind without utilizing as much detail as a part of the clarification. Lastly, “figurative language can elevate, ordinary, everyday language” (SeattlePi). Much like figurative language improves basic language, the use of similes, metaphors and symbolism add to the reader’s experience. By using figurative language, a writer draws his reader into the world he has made, which then urges the reader to be a dynamic member of it - to feel what the persona feels, to see what they see. For me, in spite of the advantages given by the usage of figurative language, there is the risk for the poet that the audience may not be able to recognize “what is meant from what is said” (Dibbs 2). But when a poem is understandable, “when it conveys new poetic insights about human experience”, we acknowledge that author for possessing a unique scholarly endowment (Dibbs
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