Fittzgerald's Use Of Weather In 'The Great Gatsby'

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Madi Wightman American Lit. 11; Essay Test Mrs.McDonnell 3/9/23 1. Fittzgerald’s use of weather in The Great Gatsby tends to connect to mood and to actions in various points in the story. We see this in chapter five with rain and sun, and in chapter seven with a scorching sun and an unbearable heat. When Gatsby and Daisy’s reunion begins it is already pouring rain. “Gatsby, pale as death, with his hands plunged like weights in his coat pockets, was standing in a puddle of water glaring tragically into my eyes. With his hands still in his coat pockets he stalked by me into the hall...I pulled the door against the increasing rain.”(86) This creates a mood of awkwardness and a bit of melancholy. The rain increasingly gets worse as Gatsby goes …show more content…

Daisy cries because it's a realization of what she was missing out on, she sees all the things that he has and wants it. She was too fast to leave Gatsby, went away for her. He wanted to be the best man for her and be able to provide for her. And when he came back she was already married so he did it all for nothing. Gatsby was determined to win Daisy over completely through the book. HE knew that he could always just be with her and treat her perfectly because he had the wealth. The wealth is what made him so likeable and …show more content…

Fitzgerald uses an allusion to the Sirens from the Odyssey in The Great Gatsby. Sirens are woman-like creatures in Greek mythology that lured mariners to destruction by singing. Their voices lured men in for money and other things just like Daisy. He connects the Sirens with Daisy’s voice in chapter one. Nick says, “I looked back at my cousin, who began to ask me questions in her low, thrilling voice. It was the kind of voice that the ear flows up and down, as if each speech is an arrangement of notes that will never be played again...there was an excitement in her voice that men who had cared for her found it difficult to forget: a singing compulsion.”(9). Her voice made the whole room stop and listen. Fitzgerald is trying make the point that

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