Five Tells That Casino Gambling Is Bad For Georgia By Jay Bookman

934 Words4 Pages

Should Major Casinos be Built in Georgia? An analysis of Jay Bookman's "Five Tells' that Casino Gambling is Bad for Georgia” In this article readers will learn how casinos are bad for Georgia and that senators are deceptive in their practices while trying to get casinos for Georgia. This analysis of Bookman’s article will cover the deception of the name change from casinos to “Destination Resorts”, where Bookman believes the revenue is going to come from, the tax issue for casinos, the effect on jobs in Georgia, and how voters are being taken advantage of. The topic of casinos in Georgia is covered in Jay Bookman’s article, "Five Tells' that Casino Gambling is Bad for Georgia". Bookman says two casinos are wanted in Georgia, but the bill …show more content…

One will cost $2 billion and the other will cost $450 million. The interesting part about this bill that Bookman points out is that the name casino will be replaced with the name “Destination Resort”. This is a change that was made by Senator Brandon Beach. “If you are too ashamed to face what you are about to do, maybe you shouldn’t do it,” Jay Bookman. Bookman makes an excellent appeal to emotion using pathos in this quote. He points out that even the people in charge of writing the senate bill do not want to call a casino a casino out of fear that the bill would be pushed aside at the mention of a …show more content…

He states that the name is meant to trick people into believing that visitors to these locations would be mostly from out of state. He explains that with forty-two states already having casinos, why would people come to Georgia for something they already have at home? Also, in the article he cites a study from Central Atlanta Progress that showed a shocking result of how little outside business the casinos would actually bring. Bookman says that the study shows that only 5.9% of the casino revenue would come from out of state. He uses proper examples for an appeal to logic. He very clearly points out that these casinos will mostly be getting revenue from Georgia residents rather than out of state visitors by the mentioning that forty-two states already have casinos. His argument is strong, but can be countered with the idea that even though people have casinos at home they may still want to visit other state’s casinos on vacation. In Tell number three of the article Bookman claims that the national tax average for casinos is 30% of revenue for each state. In Georgia the legislation has been written to only tax at a rate of 20%. He points out that if Georgia really had a market for casinos they would not need to lower the tax rate. He questions whether the legislation is written to help the casino industry or the state of Georgia. This is an appeal to logic. He points out that the bill was likely

Open Document