Foils In Wuthering Heights

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Wuthering Heights Wuthering Heights is the sole novel by Emily Brontë and is considered an English classic. The story of a love triangle is told and jotted down in a diary. Throughout the novel, the characteristics of the occupants of the two homes, Thrushcross Grange and Wuthering Heights, are noticeably different. Following the death of Catherine Linton, the traits of both homes are combined. Catherine dies a few short hours after giving birth to her daughter, young Catherine. Edgar stays with his late wife as long as his body will allow. The time arrives when Edgar has to retire to bed and the maid allows Heathcliff to see his beloved. Out of an act of selfishness, Heathcliff removes Edgar’s hair from Catherine’s locket and replaces…show more content…
These homes are also foils. Thrushcross Grange produces an aura of calmness and peace; an image of something like a meadow in the summer with birds singing might come to mind. Wuthering Heights on the other hand personifies harshness and brutality; an image winter wind blowing on cliff sides. Catherine is buried in neither the Linton plot nor Earnshaw plot in the church cemetery, but in the corner with a view over the moor. When Edgar dies, he requests to be buried next to his late wife. While he is being buried, Heathcliff asks the sexton to bury him next to Catherine and remove the adjacent sides of their coffins so that their bodies can “mingle” in the dirt. Wuthering Heights represents the tragic love story of Romeo and Juliet. The story of two feuding homes that come together after the loss of their children. Like Romeo and Juliet, Wuthering Heights is about forbidden love between Catherine and Heathcliff, who cannot be together on account of the fact that Catherine is expected to marry a gentleman. Although Catherine does not take her own life, Heathcliff does starve himself, which Nelly believes is his cause of death. They are buried together and their decomposing bodies “mingle” in the
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