Foreshadowing In Romeo And Juliet

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The connection of Dreams and Fate Well, what are dreams? Dreams are the succession of images, ideas, emotions and sensations that can be experienced throughout a period of sleep. Many dreams are usually connected to the subconscious and are the altered state of the conscious parts of the brain. In this play, the dreams were a major part of this calamity and were shown throughout the play as Romeo’s dreams actually came true. In Shakespeare’s tragedy play, Romeo and Juliet, “the two star-crossed lovers”, were killed due to grief and the harshness of them moving too quickly as they first met in the night of the party and got married in the next 24 hours. However, there were other aspects of this tragedy. Shakespeare tells us that the dreams …show more content…

Shakespeare uses foreshadowing to warn the readers and the audience that there is a perilous and dangerous situation ahead of them. This foreshadowing increases the mysterious aspect of this play by not knowing if the dream comes true. As mentioned before, Shakespeare has used foreshadowing to reveal, not what exactly what will happen in the future, but an idea of what the future might behold. There are many examples of this foreshadowing effect throughout Romeo and Juliet. One example was the night of the ball when Mercutio and Romeo were deciding to go to the ball held at Capulet's mansion to get rid of his misery, depression and his deep feelings on Rosaline. Mercutio continued to taunt Romeo by saying that Queen Mag had paid him a visit. Queen Mag is …show more content…

Just before he leaves, Juliet informs Romeo about a premonition in her dream, that she sees Romeo, dead at the bottom of a tomb. The quote, “As one dead in the bottom of a tomb” (III,v,56) once again foreshadows another scene that takes place in the final moments/final scene of the play where Romeo is actually dead at the bottom of the Capulet's tomb and Juliet stabbed herself with a dagger that Romeo brought with him. Not only that, Juliet explains as if that she was actually present in the dream and asks Romeo if it was just herself getting the dreams or if it was also Romeo who also got that dream, “Either my eyesight fails or thou lookest the pale” (III,v, 57). She questions herself if she, in reality, saw Romeo dead or if it was just a fragment of imagination. In Juliet’s dream, she doesn’t actually see Romeo killing himself but instead gets a quick glimpse of his face before the dream wafted away. She assumes that he was dead due to the paleness of his face, but, questions herself before telling Romeo. Once again, Shakespeare uses foreshadowing to advise the audience and the readers about what the future can hold for the two

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