Foreshadowing In The Lottery

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The story “The Lottery,” contains subtle instances of foreshadowing. The first example is the stones the children gather and place into piles. Secondly, Mr. Summers questions if the son of Mr. Watson will take over the drawing for his family this year due to Mr. Watson’s absence. Although both events differ, they foreshadow the same conclusion, i.e the fate of the lottery winner. Firstly, the gathering of stones by the village children, who strategically place them out of reach of other children, provides the reader as an example of foreshadowing in the following quote: “Bobby and Harry Jones and Dickie Delacroix-- the villagers pronounced this name "Dellacroy"--eventually made a great pile of stones in one corner of the square and guarded…show more content…
Summers questions a village member as to whether the son of Mr. Watson will assume the role of his father drawing due to his father’s absence. "Right." Sr. Summers said. He made a note on the list he was holding. Then he asked, "Watson boy drawing this year?” A tall boy in the crowd raised his hand. "Here," he said. "I'm drawing for my mother and me." He blinked his eyes nervously and ducked his head as several voices in the crowd said things like "Good fellow, lack." and "Glad to see your mother's got a man to do it.” The foreshadowing in the second example, provides the reader with incite that Mr. Watson is no longer present, due to his son assuming his role in the drawing. The son displays signs of nervousness and cowardice also can indicate that he is fearful of the outcome. The reader can draw a conclusion that Mr. Watson could possibly be the casualty in last year’s lottery. Two samples of foreshadowing in Shirley Jackson’s book “ The Lottery”, both in which provide factual evidence are the children collecting stones without mention of their purpose and Mr. Watson’s son acquiring his father’s position of the drawing due to his absenteeism. Both instances foreshadow the overall fate of the villagers who draw the marked card during “The
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