France's Relationship With France In The 1790s

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Since its initial discovery, America has intricately intertwined itself in international affairs. Ranging from outright enemies to close allies, the United States has experienced a wide variety of foreign relationships. During World War II, the nation found itself at odds with the dictatorships of Germany and Italy. More recently, America has suffered conflicts with countries such as Vietnam and Afghanistan. Yet, throughout its history, the United States has also entertained alliances with numerous different countries such as Poland, Australia, and Canada. These mutually beneficial relationships contributed greatly to the success of the nation both at home and abroad. Throughout the late 1770s and into the 1790s, the dynamic foreign interactions…show more content…
During the late 1770s and early 1780s, the allied support of France ultimately led America to defeat the British and gain freedom from the British Empire. After their victory in Battle of Saratoga in 1777, America finally gained recognition as an independent nation, thus earning them the allowance of an ally. On February 6, 1778, France officially offered America a treaty of alliance, solidifying their independence (Kennedy 149). Over the final five years of the war, France’s manpower and strategy became indispensable to the American people. One critical strength of the French was their powerful navy. At the Battle of Yorktown in 1781, George Washington fought the British by land, while the French, under Admiral de Grasse, blockaded the British by sea. Completely overpowered, General Cornwallis quickly admitted his defeat. Although the French provided essentially all the sea power, they also contributed over half of the troops on land (Kennedy 153). Therefore, the French lived vicariously through the American people and jointly celebrated the victory. Throughout the American Revolution, the basis of the French and America alliance ultimately rested on mutual benefit. France, upset by the land taken from them during the French and Indian War, eagerly awaited the opportunity for revenge against Britain.…show more content…
Spain’s main motivation to assist the American colonists in their revolution was a strong desire to regain the land it had lost to Britain during the French and Indian War and impede British success in other parts of the world. In April 1779, John Jay officially convinced Spain to join forces with the American people (Buescher). Rather than directly providing troops to fight alongside the Americans, Spain financed large loans and direct monetary contributions. Economically, this helped to start the Americans’ currency, the Continental, and allowed America to bring in expert foreign military officers to guide their inexperienced soldiers. Additionally, in 1779, Spain declared a war of their own against the British in Florida and Louisiana. While the main purpose of their campaign was to win back their forts previously lost to the British, it greatly benefited the American cause. Spain effectively drew British troops and ships into numerous battles, spreading thin the British troops. Ultimately, the Spanish succeeded in winning back control of the Bahamas from the British in 1782. Therefore, although commonly undermined, the Spanish support of America during the Revolution assisted the new nation greatly in their fight for
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