Frankenstein And Society In F. Scott Shelley's Frankenstein

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Shelley’s Frankenstein is often regarded as one of the greatest and most influential novels of all time. Many have dubbed it as a classic. When Dr. Frankenstein finally completed his experiment and the “creature” was born, he prejudged it as a monster. In Hollywood’s version of the book the creature is portrayed as a evil, ugly monster. Though anyone who's read the novel knows that the true evil monster is Dr.Frankenstein and Society. Throughout the novel, readers see how Dr.Frankenstein and Society automatically judge people so soon. He saw the creature and instantly didn’t want to be associated with him. Like in society when people see the weird looking child no one wants to be friends with them. Studies have shown that first impressions and judgements are created within the first ten seconds to judge someone. It's in mankind's nature as a society to judge people for everything. Society back then and still some today push away all things and people that are different. In American history, explorers pushed out Native Americans since they were different and below the explorers. When the Doctor sees what he made, he noticed the creature was odd and ran away. When folks see him in the…show more content…
Scott Fitzgerald wrote a masterpiece known as The Great Gatsby, about romance in the roaring twenties. Gatsby had a huge mansion and threw lots of parties in order to impress a girl, because similarly to today money is everything. With money you can truly do anything. With money you can own a successful or unsuccessful business, or even use that money to run for president. In the twenties, like in Gatsby, wealth was measured in the most lavish of parties you could throw. You can compare that to today's measure of wealth which could be the car you drive or even the rank on Forbes Billionaire List. The novel exemplifies how society wants to see who the rich are, because money is mankind's true desire. Society then and now perceives power and fame as the amount of money you

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