Frankenstein By Mary Shelly: Poem Analysis

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“The fallen angel becomes a malignant devil. Yet even that enemy of God and man had friends and associates in his desolation; I am quite alone” (Shelly 160). It is important to think about the consequences before carrying out an action. Advancements in science and medicine can be an accelerated way to lose innocence and gain selfish desire. The ambitions can also be a beacon of hope if carried out in the right way. Mary Shelly’s novel, Frankenstein, revolves around the idea of men, even with the most noble intentions, having a deep desire for knowledge and the outcome resulting with dire consequences. When experimenting with new life it is impossible to know the outcome; this concept is well demonstrated by Frankenstein’s creation. Creating…show more content…
The poem is about a sailor who was lead to safety by a cordial albatross, and later decides to shoot and kill the bird. He faces torment in many ways as punishment for defacing nature and taking away an innocent creature’s life. Shelly sets up an interesting comparison to Robert Walton and his voyage with this poem. Shortly after this resemblance, Victor Frankenstein is spotted on the ice and Shelly hints at the similarity of the two scientists. This appears to be a foreshadowing about Walton’s humanity being in danger and inevitably being corrupted later in time. Just as Victor found his albatross the young scientist, Walton, will be no…show more content…
Frankenstein’s unfortunate creature by calling it a “monster.” The capable being has a range of humanlike emotions and goes through a great deal of unnecessary suffering. Because of the creature’s complexity, the reader can empathize with it. “My person was hideous, and my stature gigantic: what did this mean? Who was I? What was I? Whence did I come? What is my destination? These questions continually recurred, but I was unable to solve them” (Shelly 89). The intellectual creature simply wants to be accepted by one person and is heartbroken by the isolation he must face. The true monstrosity in this novel is his creator, Victor Frankenstein. Mary Shelly was inspired by the tale of Prometheus at the time of her writing. Victor seeks enlightenment and is fascinated with power. One of the most notable similarities in the novel is their obsession with electricity or lightning. In the controversial tale of Prometheus it is debatable if he died in vain. He tried better the lives of those he molded out of clay, where Victor Frankenstein did not. Dr. Frankenstein shares his story with the young Captain and his crew, and reiterates his suffering and agony due to his curiosity in the final
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